android

Malware-serving theaters for your android phones - Part 2

In this post I will analyze the Android APK files that my friend Pietro Delsante from the Honeynet Project Sysenter Chapter talks about in his previous post (thank you Pietro). The files are all named "video.apk" and these are the MD5 and SHA256 hashes:

Is Android malware served in theatres more sophisticated?

Pietro wrote a nice post about him finding Android malware while visiting the theatre. Thanks to Thug (thank you Angelo) and HoneyProxy, he was able to get some interesting details about their infrastructure. I was curious what kind of malware you find in a theatre, so I quickly looked at one of the samples that he mentioned: f6ad9ced69913916038f5bb94433848d.

Malware-serving theaters for your android phones - Part 1

Some nights ago I was heading to a local theater with some (non-nerd) friends. We did not recall very well the address, so I brought out my phone (LG Nexus 4 with Android 4.4.2 and Google Chrome) and googled for it. I found the theater's official site and started looking for the contact info, when Chrome suddenly opened a popup window pointing me to a Russian web site (novostivkontakte.ru) urging me to update my Flash Player. I laughed loudly and showed them to my (again, totally non-nerd) friends saying that the site had been owned. One of them went on and opened the site with her own phone (Samsung Galaxy S Advance with Android 4.4.1 and the default Android WebKit browser). To make a long story short, after a few instants her phone was downloading a file without even asking her for confirmation. So: Chrome on my Nexus 4 was using social engineering to have me click on a link and manually download the file; Android's WebKit on her Galaxy S Advance was instead downloading the file straight away: interesting! However, we were a bit late and we had to run for the comedy, so I did not even bother to see what the heck she had downloaded, I only made sure she hadn't opened it. I thought it was just the usual exploit kit trying to infect PCs by serving fake Flash Player updates, seen tons of those. While waiting for the comedy to begin, I quickly submitted the compromised site to three different services, the first three ones that came to my mind: HoneyProxy Client, Wepawet and Unmask Parasites, then turned off my phone and enjoyed the show.

AREsoft-updater Released

AREsoft-updater is a simple updater script for Android Reverse Engineering Software belongs to Android Reverse Engineering (A.R.E.) Virtual Machine from the Honeynet Project

AREsoft-updater will check for the latest available version of each individual project/tool listed above and compare it with the local (installed) version in A.R.E. If newer version is available, AREsoft-updater will automatically download and install the update for your A.R.E

Beta Release of DroidBox for Android 2.3 and APIMonitor

I'm announcing the new features of Android dynamic analysis tool DroidBox as GSoC 2012 approaches the end. In this release, I would like to introduce two parts of my work: DroidBox porting and APIMonitor.

Android Reverse Engineering (A.R.E.) Virtual Machine available for download now!

The Honeynet Project is happy to announce the release of the Android Reverse Engineering (A.R.E.) Virtual Machine.

Do you need to analyze a piece of Android malware, but dont have all your analysis tools at hand? The Android Reverse Engineering (A.R.E.) Virtual Machine, put together by Anthony Desnos from our French chapter, is here to help. A.R.E. combines the latest Android malware analysis tools in a readily accessible toolbox.

Tools currently found on A.R.E. are:

  • Androguard
  • Android sdk/ndk
  • APKInspector
  • Apktool
  • Axmlprinter

DroidBox: beta release

Beta version is out and the install instructions are available at the project webpage. The new features are:

  • Prevent some emulator evasion techniques
  • Added visualization of analysis results
  • Automated app installation and execution
  • Displaying analysis information about the APK
  • Static pre-check extracts the app's registered Intents

The following figures show the new visualization added to the beta version.

DroidBox treemapDroidBox behavior graph

APKInspector BETA Release & Demo Video

As the deadline of GSOC has passed, I would like to announce the APKinspector Beta1.0. APKinspector is a tool to help Android application analysts and reverse engineers to analyze the compiled Android packages and their corresponding codes. You can review the Alpha version report and the page of this project to know more about it.

Click the picture below to watch a full demonstration video of APKInspector:

APKInspector Demo Video

Chinese viewers may view the demo at: http://v.youku.com/v_show/id_XMjk3ODAwMzU2.html

Based on the Alpha release, APKinspector has added some features as follows:

DroidBox: alpha release

The Android application sandbox is now ready for an alpha release. Details on how to get DroidBox running are available at the project webpage.

At the moment, the following actions are logged during runtime:

  • File read and write operations
  • Cryptography API activity
  • Opened network connections
  • Outgoing network traffic
  • Information leaks through the following sinks: network, file, sms
  • Attempts to send SMS
  • Phone calls that have been made

DroidBox: testing with Geinimi sample

One of the very first Android malwares, Geinimi has been analyzed in the application sandbox DroidBox that is currently being developed. The project is part of GSoC 2011 in collaboration with Honeynet and as a master thesis. The Geinimi application uses DES encryption, and it's possible to uncrypt statically the content, see picture below.

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