Welcome To The Honeynet Project Website!

Welcome to our new website as we enter the age of Web 2.0.  We have created a more dynamic website to allow our membes to create and publish their own content.  We have so many different activities going on with our various members that it can be challenging even for us to keep up.  The goal is that each member can now publish and share with the community whenever they like.  In addition we still have all the old content on the website.  We are still in the process of moving some content over, such as some of our KYE papers.  If you find content missing, a broken link or have any sugg Read more »

MS08-067 exploitation in the wild

(This article was originally published at http://honeytrap.mwcollect.org/msexploit.)
If you followed IT security related blogs or mailinglists lately, you are aware that a critical server service vulnerability in Microsoft operating systems was published recently. I'm not going to talk about the details here, there are great resources available elsewhere (and the "reversing the ms08-067 patch" article isn't the only advice about exploiting holes you get on that page).
OK, what have we got this time? One of our honeytrap sensors caught an MS08-067 exploitation attempt today which we take as an example to show how to perform a quick analysis and check what it does. If you want to play along, get the (sanitized) pcap from here. Read more »

HeX LiveCD to be 2.0-RC2 soon.

As effort of the Honeynet Project Malaysian chapter and the RawPacket team initiative, HeX LiveCD was created. It is a Network Security Monitoring (NSM) centric Live CD, built based on the principles of NSM, for analysts, by analysts. This project will be eventually forked to Hex Sensor and Hex Server to complete the cycle of NSM processes. Besides, HeX LiveCD is the blueprint for HornyD. HornyD and HoneySuckle are the toolkits for the Malaysia Distributed Honeynet Project. Read more »

No more emulation!

Emulation is an important technology in honeypots and honeynets. It's not always what we want, though, and here's why. As you might know, most bots perform attacks in multiple stages, i.e., they

  • send some exploit code to the victim that opens a shell,
  • connect to that shell or let the shell connect back,
  • invoke commands to download the actual malware binary,
  • execute the malware.

Catching the exploit and providing a fake shell isn't too hard, as shown in this post. But we certainly don't want a malware to get executed on our honeypot, not even in an emulated environment. Instead, we want to do different things with it, e.g., submit it to a central service for automated analysis. Read more »

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