To learn the tools, tactics and motives involved in computer and network attacks, and share the lessons learned.

Blogs

Malware-serving theaters for your android phones - Part 2

In this post I will analyze the Android APK files that my friend Pietro Delsante from the Honeynet Project Sysenter Chapter talks about in his previous post (thank you Pietro). The files are all named "video.apk" and these are the MD5 and SHA256 hashes:

Is Android malware served in theatres more sophisticated?

Pietro wrote a nice post about him finding Android malware while visiting the theatre. Thanks to Thug (thank you Angelo) and HoneyProxy, he was able to get some interesting details about their infrastructure. I was curious what kind of malware you find in a theatre, so I quickly looked at one of the samples that he mentioned: f6ad9ced69913916038f5bb94433848d.

Malware-serving theaters for your android phones - Part 1

Some nights ago I was heading to a local theater with some (non-nerd) friends. We did not recall very well the address, so I brought out my phone (LG Nexus 4 with Android 4.4.2 and Google Chrome) and googled for it. I found the theater's official site and started looking for the contact info, when Chrome suddenly opened a popup window pointing me to a Russian web site (novostivkontakte.ru) urging me to update my Flash Player. I laughed loudly and showed them to my (again, totally non-nerd) friends saying that the site had been owned. One of them went on and opened the site with her own phone (Samsung Galaxy S Advance with Android 4.4.1 and the default Android WebKit browser). To make a long story short, after a few instants her phone was downloading a file without even asking her for confirmation. So: Chrome on my Nexus 4 was using social engineering to have me click on a link and manually download the file; Android's WebKit on her Galaxy S Advance was instead downloading the file straight away: interesting! However, we were a bit late and we had to run for the comedy, so I did not even bother to see what the heck she had downloaded, I only made sure she hadn't opened it. I thought it was just the usual exploit kit trying to infect PCs by serving fake Flash Player updates, seen tons of those. While waiting for the comedy to begin, I quickly submitted the compromised site to three different services, the first three ones that came to my mind: HoneyProxy Client, Wepawet and Unmask Parasites, then turned off my phone and enjoyed the show.

2014 Honeynet Project Security Workshop in Warsaw!

The Honeynet Project would like to cordially invite you to attend the 2014 Honeynet Project Security Workshop , held in Adgar Plaza Conference Center in Warsaw, Poland from 12-14 May 2014. The workshop is organized by The Honeynet Project and coordinating with CERT Polska under NASK. Interested in sponsoring the workshop, download the workshop brochure now !

New project CEO

Last week it was announced that Angelo Dell'Aera is elected as our new CEO. Here is a brief description about Angelo.

Hide and go seek, not hide and go tweak

On July 31, 2013, Jason Geffner of CrowdStrike discussed a new tool called "Tortilla" that allows incident responders and computer security researchers to hide behind the Tor network as they poke and prod malicious software infrastructure. Were I there, I would have asked Jason this question: What things should I not do while using Tortilla, and why shouldn't I do them? I know Jason and respect his technical skills, but if he and CrowdStrike don't have a good answer, that will say a lot about our field's collective ability to reason about actions along the Active Response Continuum. [D. Dittrich and K. E. Himma. Active Response to Computer Intrusions. Chapter 182 in Vol. III, Handbook of Information Security, 2005. http://ssrn.com/abstract=790585.]

MalwareZ: visualizing malware activity on earth map

MalwareZ is a visualization project that is started as a YakindanEgitim (YE) project. YE is a startup that me and some collegues mentor young people on specific projects, remotely. It is announced as a local fork of Google Summer of Code, except neither mentors nor mentees are paid.

Gürcan Gerçek was the main developer for the MalwareZ project and my role was mentoring him.

GSoC2013 Blog Online

To have a better visibility of this years GSoC projects we have created a blog for the students and their mentors. This blog is the place where students should post weekly updates about their progress. It is also the place where students and mentors can share their findings and experiences about and during the GSoC projects as they happen. The first updates have already started to drip in and it is getting interesting.

A hot summer, cool drinks and happy coding to all the participants.

http://gsoc2013.honeynet.org

Thug: 1000 commits, 1000 thanks

Two years are passed from the first commit and taking a look at the number of committed patches I realized that right now the patch number 1000 was committed. Let me say it's really impressive realizing it. In the last two years I had a lot of fun thinking and designing the future of this project and I'm really proud of what Thug turned to be. I have to thank a lot of persons who contributed with their suggestions, ideas, bug reports and sometimes patches. You know who you are. Really thanks!

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